Grant Management 101: A 10-Step Guide to Keeping Hard-Earned Funds

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The last thing any agency wants to do is give back grant funding due to mismanagement.

Writing a successful grant proposal takes a lot of time and effort, but managing the grant after receiving it can be just as much work — if not more.

Grant funders have a vested interest in making sure recipients do what they described in their application, with the budget they proposed. But all too commonly, agencies awarded a grant have little to no plan as to who will be responsible for the financial recordkeeping or program reporting, the result of which is an audit, or even worse, having to return thousands of dollars for mismanagement of funds.

Take for example the county in California that returned over $1 million in disaster relief funding to FEMA due to poor recordkeeping. The audit came years after the project was completed.

Then there was also the large university in New England had to pay the Federal Environmental Protection Agency $2.5 million in damages and penalties to settle civil allegations that the institution submitted false claims on approximately 500 federal grants awarded to them.

The city of Baltimore has also been cited on more than one occasion for not properly accounting for millions in grant funding.

The reasons agencies are faulted for mismanagement of grant funds are numerous and can include:

  • Lack of clear policies;
  • Limited staff oversight;
  • Faulty accounting;
  • Little documentation or missing records;
  • Falsifying time and effort records of grant-funded staff;
  • Purchasing items not on the approved budget;
  • Slow or no progress reporting to the granting agency;
  • Inability to secure the required local matching funds.

The penalties for poor grants management vary based on the severity of the problem and granting agency’s procedures. These may include:

  • Returning the portion of the funding that was disallowed;
  • Freezing all grant funds until proper procedures are in place;
  • Payment of fines to the granting agency;
  • Suspension or debarment from receiving future grants;
  • Increased level of financial and/or programmatic oversight by the granting agency.

The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) is one of many grantors that has a formalized policy and will place grantees on “restricted status” if they deem an agency to be financially unstable, have inadequate financial management systems, or are poor programmatic performers. Grants deemed restricted status require closer monitoring by the agency.

No agency wants to be placed under a microscope because of poor management of grant funds. Being good stewards of the funding awarded can put you in a strong position to receive future grant dollars to cover needed agency resources or to support innovative ideas.

Strategies for Grant Management

Follow these steps for effective grants management as soon as you receive the grant award:

#1 Convene a grants management team of agency staff who will be responsible for the oversight of the grant-funded project.

This should include, at a minimum, your operational project manager, fiscal director, human resources staff, accounting staff and legal/ethics officer. Review the grant award documents and discuss all of the requirements of the grant contract so you are familiar with your responsibilities imposed by the granting agency.

#2 Delegate specific roles for those on the grants management team.

Determine who will be responsible for fiscal oversight and reporting, and who will collect the data for programmatic and performance reporting. Establish internal controls for checks and balances and separation of duties.

#3 Draft policies and procedures on how to spend the funds, what documentation is required and how often to report expenditures.

If written policies and procedures are already in place, review them with the team and revise as necessary to conform with the granting agency’s requirements.

#4 Establish a separate financial account for the receipt, expenditure and reporting of the grant funds.

Federal regulations prohibit the commingling of federal grant funds with funds from other sources.

#5 Identify and earmark the local matching funds.

Make sure these funds are available throughout the entire grant project period.

#6 Purchase only those items that were approved in your grant application budget.

If you need to make changes to the budget, follow the granting agency’s guidelines and receive written approval of any changes in advance.

#7 Follow proper procurement and accounting practices for the obligation and expenditures of the grant funds.

Seek competitive bids, and create formal purchase orders, payment records and invoices.

#8 Keep good records.

Establish a separate folder by grant award and keep copies of the grant award documents, vendor quotes, purchase orders, invoices, payments (checks or electronic payments), timesheets of grant-funded personnel, inventories of equipment and supplies purchased with grant funds, contracts, accounting ledgers, project photos and submitted grantor reports.

#9 Review your agency’s IT infrastructure.

You’ll need to determine if upgrades are necessary to allow for the collection of fiscal and performance data and submission of reports through the granting agency’s online portal.

#10 Complete all grantor-required financial and program/performance reports on time.

Highlight your successes and discuss your implementation challenges.

If you follow these strategies, you will not only breeze through any audit or grantor-monitoring visit, but will also better position your agency to receive grant awards in the future.

Therese Matthews is a highly respected grant professional with over 25 years of experience in grant writing, grants management and program development. Prior to her retirement in 2015, she was the Grants Manager for the New Jersey Department of Corrections and successful in obtaining over $140 million in federal, state and private grant funding for the agency. The grant award portfolio included federal funding from the Departments of Justice, Education, Homeland Security, Health and Human Services, Labor and FEMA, along with several state and private foundation sources. She also has extensive experience as a peer reviewer for several federal and state grant applications in addition to providing grant writing and grants management training to non-profit and government agencies across New Jersey. Her career with corrections also included directing juvenile and adult offender management and rehabilitation programs, developing community corrections and restorative justice initiatives and overseeing contract administration for parole and reentry services.

Since joining Praetorian Digital as a contracted consultant in March of 2016, Therese has been successful in writing several comprehensive grant proposals resulting in over $800,000 in grant awarded funds. These grants include awards under the Department of Justice’s Second Chance Act, Texas Body Armor Grant and the U.S. Department of Agriculture Rural Development Community Facilities Program. Additionally, she had conducted extensive grant research for law enforcement, fire and non-profit agencies across the country. Over 100 customized research reports were written in her first year of engagement. She has been the featured trainer at Praetorian Digital Grant Administration meetings and has mentored new contracted grant writers in their early engagements. Therese has also written several articles highlighting strategies for obtaining justice funding to support specialized law enforcement equipment. These articles were published in recently PoliceGrantsHelp e-Guides and featured on the PoliceOne website.

Therese continues to volunteer her time providing fundraising and grant writing assistance to various community organizations including her local board of education, nonprofit organizations and sports booster club. She holds a Bachelors in Sociology and Criminal Justice and Masters of Public Administration from Rutgers University.

Contact Therese Matthews for Grant Assistance.

Learn about federal grant reporting requirements:

Federal Grant Reporting Changes & Post-Award Grant Management

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